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Peake addresses chamber

State Sen. Mark Peake, R-Lynchburg, who represents the 22nd State Senate District, provided insight into the upcoming state legislative session and answered questions from business and community leaders during the Farmville Chamber of Commerce meeting Monday afternoon at the Woodland Community Center.

Peake’s district includes the counties of Amherst, Appomattox, Buckingham, Cumberland, Fluvanna, Goochland and Prince Edward, along with parts of Louisa and Lynchburg City.

Peake, during the discussion, spoke about his involvement as a senator, being elected during a special election in January.

More than 70 attended the meeting, and some asked questions related to solar energy and gerrymandering.

Peake said he frequently attends political and nonpolitical events across the Heart of Virginia, noting his attendance of a picnic for the Republican Party in town last week and visiting school board and county meetings in Prince Edward, Cumberland and Buckingham counties.

He noted that former state Sen. and now U.S. Rep. Tom Garrett, R-Buckingham, initiated legislation honoring Barbara Johns in the state, designating April 23 as Barbara Rose Johns Day. Peake remembered attending a presentation of the legislation at the Moton Museum, where Johns’ family was present.

“(I’m) very thrilled to be a part of that,” Peake said.

He noted the importance of community input in contacting state representatives about issues that affect local government and education.

“We serve you, and that is our obligation. But we need to hear from you guys (as to) what is going on, what opportunities exist (and) what kind of developments you want to make,” Peake said. “It’s up to you guys to keep us informed (as to) what’s going on in the area.”

Following a question from the audience regarding the upcoming legislative session, Peake said this year, members of the state legislature will discuss the budget and will ready themselves to discuss issues related to the economy, education and taxes, along with social issues.

“You never know what issue might catch on,” Peake said.

He noted Confederate statues in the commonwealth — the subject of a white nationalist march in Charlottesville that resulted in the death of three people — have been the topic of debate among state officials.

“We have a statute on the books that prevents localities from moving or altering war dedication, war memorials. (Attorney General) Mark Herring had argued that that was only applied to statues erected after 1998 or 1999 when they passed that. The Charlottesville court has said no, it applies to all of the statues going back to the late 1800s, early 1900s,” Peake said. “That will probably be appealed. I’m sure it will be appealed. So, we may have some legislation on statues. There, I’m sure we’ll have some gun proposals, gun legislation, because of Charlottesville and marching with guns and carrying guns and open parades in addition to what might come up after the tragedy in Las Vegas.”

When asked what issues were most important to him, Peake said he believed in less state and federal government involvement toward small businesses and economic growth. He noted that tax reform may be a topic of discussion during the upcoming legislative session.

“Less government involvement is one of my platforms,” Peake said. “Less regulation. Let businesses operate. Let them create jobs, which is the best way for anyone to create jobs, for small businesses to get out there, innovate, use their brainpower, their capital, and I think that’s what makes the economy grow. What I hate to see from the state level is a whole lot of regulations … Our tax system has not changed in over 100 years for the most part. And so at some point we’re going to have to look at some kind of tax reform. (Republican nominee for governor) Ed Gillespie has proposed cutting the state income tax some. Tennessee has done away with the state income tax. Florida has no state income tax. Texas has no state income tax. So that’s one of the things Ed Gillespie’s proposed — reducing the state income tax.”

Hood Frazier, of Prince Edward, posed a question regarding gerrymandering and redistricting.

“I don’t like the incumbent protection part of it,” Peake said. “I told people that I will vote for constitutional redistricting, which is continuous and compact districts, and I think that’s what we have to do, and the public has paid a lot more attention to it. The 2021 group is out there, and putting a lot more pressure on lawmakers to sign it. You’re getting people on both sides who are starting to come together on that. I’m not sure that I’m willing to just turn it over to an independent group because I don’t believe there are just true independent groups, and those people don’t answer to anybody. If we do it, we have to answer to the voters.”

Peake said following the meeting he attends events to gain perspectives from area residents that he can take to the state legislature.

“People want to know who’s representing them,” Peake said. “One of the most important things I can do is be available to talk to the citizens.”

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http://www.farmvilleherald.com/2017/10/peake-addresses-chamber/

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The Pattern in the Early Special Elections of 2017

You’re So Very Special,

I Wish I Was Special Earlier this month, I noted the five special U.S. House elections scheduled for this year will be a good test of whether there really is an energized liberal grassroots movement mobilizing that could be the equivalent of the Tea Party on the Left, or whether we’re just seeing the same familiar activists in the same familiar places. There have already been a handful special state legislative elections this year, and there’s been a pattern. In January in Virginia, Republican Mark Peake won the special election in the 22nd Senate District around Lynchberg, a district that usually votes Republican. The same night, Democrat Jennifer L. McClellan won in the 9th Senate District, which includes part of Richmond.

This is a heavily-Democratic district; most years the Republicans don’t even field a candidate, and they didn’t field one in the special election. In Virginia’s 85th House District, which covers Virginia Beach, N.D. “Rocky” Holcomb III beat Cheryl Turpin, keeping the seat Republican and winning by about the same margin that his predecessor Scott Taylor won in 2013. In other words, in three low-turnout special elections in Virginia so far this year, the political environment is pretty close to normal. In Iowa, Democrat Monica Kurth won the special election in the 89th State House District with 72 percent.

The previous incumbent, Jim Lykam, ran unopposed in 2016 and 2014 and won 67 percent in 2012. In Minnesota, Republican Anne Neu won 53 percent in the House District 32B race, about what her GOP predecessor Bob Barrett had won. Again, these results are pretty much “normal.” A writer at Daily Kos touts the fact that that these Democrat special election candidates ran ahead of Hillary Clinton’s margin these districts, but I’m not so sure that’s the right measuring stick. These state legislative candidates may be better on the campaign trail than Clinton – in fact, they probably are! – but they’re not generating significantly different results. In Delaware, control over the state Senate will come down to one special election being held this Saturday. If the Democrats lose this race, Republicans would control the chamber for the first time in 44 years, and so they’re making extraordinary efforts for a special election.

The fight between Democrat Stephanie Hansen and Republican John Marino has been among the fiercest fought local elections in Delaware history. The election will decide not only who represents Middletown, Glasgow and southern Newark, but also whether the Democrats’ 44-year-old Senate majority comes to an end. Democrats are poised to spend a record-shattering $1 million. Between Jan. 27 and Feb. 17, Hansen’s campaign raised $306,472 from hundreds of donors, both from inside Delaware and all over the country. Political advisers say it usually costs about $50,000 to win a state Senate race or $100,000 for one that is particularly fierce. In Delaware’s 10th State Senate District, the previous incumbent, Democrat Bethany Hall-Long, ran unopposed in 2012 and had a close race in 2014. Considering their institutional and financial advantages, Democrats should win this special election. If they don’t, it’s a sign that the much-touted grassroots anger at Donald Trump isn’t translating into votes when and where the party needs them.

Story Here:
http://www.nationalreview.com/corner/445131/pattern-early-special-elections-2017

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UPDATE: Mark Peake to take Tom Garrett’s 22nd district Senate seat

A Republican Lynchburg attorney has defeated two challengers in a special election for a central Virginia Senate seat, ensuring that the Legislature’s upper chamber remains in GOP control.

Results in Tuesday’s 22nd Senate District race were still being tallied late Tuesday, but Democrat Ryant Washington’s campaign manager said Washington has conceded to Republican Mark Peake.

Unofficial results from the state Department of Elections with more than 90 percent of precincts reporting showed Peake with a commanding lead. He had around 54 percent, Washington around 38 percent and independent Joe Hines had around 8 percent.

An elections official said results were delayed because too few ballots were printed in Lynchburg, and the back-up ballots had to be hand-counted.

Had Washington won, it would have created a 20-20 split in the Senate and effectively handed control to Democrats because of the lieutenant governor’s tiebreaker status.

9:15 p.m.:

Mark Peake will likely win Tom Garrett’s Senate seat representing the 22nd district.

According to the Virginia Board of Elections website, at last check Peake was ahead of challenger Ryant Washington 54% to 37%, with 85% of precincts reporting.

Peake has 25 years of courtroom experience as an attorney. He also represented the Lynchburg area on the Commonwealth Transportation Board.

8:20 p.m. (AP):

A Republican sheriff’s office captain has defeated a Democratic school teacher in the race for a Virginia Beach-area House of Delegates seat.

Unofficial results from the state Department of Elections show N.D. “Rocky” Holcomb III beat Cheryl Turpin by about six percentage points Tuesday in the 85th District.

The special election was held to replace Republican Scott Taylor, who was elected to Congress. Republicans already controlled a solid majority in the House of Delegates.

The General Assembly convenes Wednesday.
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7:45 p.m.
Democratic State Del. Jennifer McClellan has won a seat in the state Senate.

Unofficial results from the state Department of Elections show McClellan beat Libertarian Corey Fauconier in Tuesday’s special election.

Republicans did not field a candidate for the heavily Democratic-leaning 9th Senate District that includes Charles City County and parts of Henrico County, Hanover County and Richmond.

McClellan is a corporate attorney who lives in Richmond. She was elected to the House of Delegates in 2005.

The special election was held to replace Democrat Donald McEachin, who was elected to Congress in November.

Story Here:
http://www.wdbj7.com/content/news/Virginia-special-elections-round-up-410333065.html

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Latest: Democrat concedes 22nd District Senate race

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — The Latest on a special election in Virginia (all times local):

9:45 p.m.

A Republican Lynchburg attorney has defeated two challengers in a special election for a central Virginia Senate seat, ensuring that the Legislature’s upper chamber remains in GOP control.

Results in Tuesday’s 22nd Senate District race were still being tallied late Tuesday, but Democrat Ryant Washington’s campaign manager said Washington has conceded to Republican Mark Peake.

Unofficial results from the state Department of Elections with more than 90 percent of precincts reporting showed Peake with a commanding lead. He had around 54 percent, Washington around 38 percent and independent Joe Hines had around 8 percent. An elections official said results were delayed because too few ballots were printed in Lynchburg, and the back-up ballots had to be hand-counted.

Had Washington won, it would have created a 20-20 split in the Senate and effectively handed control to Democrats because of the lieutenant governor’s tiebreaker status.

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9:20 p.m.

A Republican Lynchburg attorney has a commanding lead in a central Virginia Senate race, though complete results are being delayed by an issue that resulted in the hand-counting of some ballots.

According to unofficial results from the Virginia Department of Elections, Republican Mark Peake has around 55 percent of the vote in the 22nd Senate District with around 86 percent of precincts reporting. Democrat Ryant Washington had around 37 percent and independent Joe Hines around 8 percent.

All outstanding precincts are in the city of Lynchburg, where the state’s top elections official says enough ballots weren’t printed. Department of Elections Commissioner Edgardo Cortes says officials had to use emergency ballots, which must be counted by hand.

The Democratic Party of Virginia issued a statement commending Washington for a hard-fought race, though Washington’s campaign manager said he had not conceded.

The outcome of the race will determine which party controls the Senate.

___

8:20 p.m.

A Republican sheriff’s office captain has defeated a Democratic school teacher in the race for a Virginia Beach-area House of Delegates seat.

Unofficial results from the state Department of Elections show N.D. “Rocky” Holcomb III beat Cheryl Turpin by about six percentage points Tuesday in the 85th District.

The special election was held to replace Republican Scott Taylor, who was elected to Congress. Republicans already controlled a solid majority in the House of Delegates.

The General Assembly convenes Wednesday.

___

7:45 p.m.

Democratic State Del. Jennifer McClellan has won a seat in the state Senate.

Unofficial results from the state Department of Elections show McClellan beat Libertarian Corey Fauconier in Tuesday’s special election. Republicans did not field a candidate for the heavily Democratic-leaning 9th Senate District that includes Charles City County and parts of Henrico County, Hanover County and Richmond.

McClellan is a corporate attorney who lives in Richmond. She was elected to the House of Delegates in 2005.

The special election was held to replace Democrat Donald McEachin, who was elected to Congress in November.

___

7 p.m.

The state’s top elections official says not enough ballots were printed in Lynchburg for the 22nd District state Senate race.

Edgardo Cortes, commissioner of the Virginia Department of Elections, says his department became aware of the issue early Tuesday and has been working with local officials on distributing emergency ballots, which are printed on plain paper and will have to be hand-counted.

Cortes says officials are still trying to determine whether anyone was unable to vote because of the problem.

He says the issue will likely delay the reporting of results from Lynchburg.

Cortes says no other locality has reported any issues.

Voters are picking two new state senators and one member of the House of Delegates to replace the three state lawmakers who were elected to Congress in November.

___

4:45 p.m.

Some Lynchburg-area residents who tried to vote in the 22nd Senate District special election have reported polling places running out of ballots and requesting the delivery of extras.

The News & Advance (http://bit.ly/2jfT00F ) reported Tuesday that at least two precincts had run out of ballots. Voters at one precinct stood in line waiting for a delivery for more to arrive, and some people told the paper voters had left without voting because of the delay.

One precinct’s election chief told the newspaper more people than anticipated had shown up to vote.

Neither Lynchburg registrar Karen Patterson nor a spokeswoman for the state Board of Elections could immediately be reached for comment by The Associated Press.

The election is being held to replace Republican Tom Garrett, who was elected to Congress in November. Republican Mark Peake, Democrat Ryant Washington and independent Joe Hines are competing for the seat.

___

2 a.m.

Virginia voters are picking two state senators in a special election that could effectively hand control of that chamber from Republicans to Democrats.

Tuesday’s elections in the 9th and 22nd Senate districts are being held to replace a Republican and Democrat who were elected to Congress.

If Democrats win both, they would effectively gain Senate control because of Lt. Gov. Ralph Northam’s status as a tiebreaker.

In the more closely watched race, a Republican, Democrat and conservative independent are competing for the Republican-leaning 22nd District.

Democrats are expected to easily win the heavily blue 9th District, in which Republicans didn’t field a candidate.

A Virginia Beach House seat is also up for grabs, though the outcome won’t affect Republicans’ solid majority in that chamber.

Copyright © 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.

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https://wtop.com/virginia/2017/01/latest-elections-official-not-enough-ballots-in-lynchburg/

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Mark Peake hopes to win senate seat and keep district conservative

LYNCHBURG, Va. (NEWSPLEX) — Mark Peake is the Republican candidate for the 22nd District race. He’s a Lynchburg lawyer, father of five, and says that his top priority is to keep the 22nd District and state Senate Republican.

“The winner of this race will decide the majority of the senate,” he said.

The district has been held by a Republican for more than 20 years, and he said that he doesn’t want a Democrat taking control due to a bill up for vote in the next session.

“Barbara Favola (D) introduced a bill to require gun registration. I am a strong supporter of the Second Amendment. I do not want universal gun registration in the state of Virginia,” he said.

Peake said if he was elected, he would hope to work on a lot of different issues, including job growth, health care, and state trooper benefits.

“The troopers are down 100 to 200 troopers, depending on the reports. Their pay is low, and their morale is low,” he said.

That being said, Peake says his main concern is also the concern of many already in office.

“The biggest concern this immediate session is the budget and how to whittle it down. We have a deficit, so we have to get it into compliance,” he said.

He said that he plans to do that by carefully looking through the entire budget proposal and finding the areas that could be trimmed, which is a trait on which his predecessor Tom Garrett, Jr. prided himself.

“I plan to continue a lot of what he did, which is constitutional, conservative principles, limited government, and a budget hawk,” Peake said.

He also said that if the state Senate has a Republican majority, they will be able to more closely work with their national counterparts.

“President [Donald] Trump has a lot of great policies in mind to make this country great again. I know that’s what I want to do in Virginia, support our local workers, and make sure we look after our own first,” he said.

The election takes place on Jan. 10.

Story Here:
http://www.newsplex.com/content/news/Mark-Peake-hopes-to-win-senate-seat-and-keep-district-conservative-410183075.html

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Tuesday — Vote Mark Peake for State Senate

Mark Peake, Republican candidate for the Special Election on Tuesday for the 22nd State Senate District, is out today in the snow, wind, and cold working with Peter Finocchio, going door-to-door to meet voters and ask for their support.

The 22nd District covers part of Lynchburg City, Amherst County, Appomattox County, Buckingham County, Cumberland County, Fluvanna County, Goochland County, and part of Louisa County.

This race will decide the balance of power in the senate. If Mark wins, Republicans will have control. If he loses, it will be tied up 20-20 and the Democratic lieutenant governor will break the tie. It all comes down to turnout. General Assembly convenes the next day, Wednesday, January 11.
“Mark Peake would be an excellent addition to the State Senate, carrying on the conservative principals that are needed for Virginia. We need Mark Peake in the State Senate.” -Marty Williams, Immediate Past State President of the FOP of Virginia and 3rd district Congressional candidate.

Story Here:
https://bearingdrift.com/2017/01/08/tuesday-vote-mark-peake-state-senate/

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Peake Makes Final Push for VA State Senate in 22nd District

Peake Makes Final Push for VA State Senate in 22nd District
“More Freedom and Less Government” is the campaign message of Mark Peake, the Republican candidate for the 22nd District State of Virginia Senate seat. The seat was opened when Tom Garrett was elected to the US Congress in November.
Appomattox will participate in a special election on January 10, 2017, to fill the void left behind by Garrett. Peake will run against Democrat Ryant Washington and Independent Joseph Hines.

The 22nd District includes Amherst County, Appomattox County, Buckingham County, Cumberland County, Fluvanna County, Goochland County, part of Louisa County, and part of the City of Lynchburg.

On December 3, 2016, Peake, an attorney from Lynchburg, defeated Goochland County Supervisor Ken Peterson at a GOP convention hosted by the 22nd District Republican Committee at Hampden-Sydney College.

Peake believes that too much government regulation has created unfavorable conditions and lack of economic growth. “It’s killing our businesses, it’s stifling everything that we try to do,” he stated. “A lot of that is Obamacare, things that come down from the federal government and state government. So, I think we need to limit the regulations, limit taxation, encourage our small business growth. That’s how we get economic development.”
Peake emphasized the need for more jobs in Appomattox and using taxpayer money more wisely. Peake said, “What people want is the ability to take care of their family with jobs, education, safety.”

Heavy burdens subjected upon citizens by the government drive Peake’s desire to work for the people of the 22nd District and Appomattox County. “We want to be left alone by the government, so that’s been my philosophy, and if I get to Richmond that will be my philosophy there.”

Other issues important to Peake are supporting pro life issues, the 2nd Amendment and the free market system.

Peake also emphasizes the balance of power in the Virginia State Senate is at stake. He explained that because of the seat vacated by Garrett, the Republicans currently hold a 20-19 lead over the Democrats. “If the Democrats win it’s 20-20 and (Lt. Governor Ralph) Northam, who is a Democrat, is the tie-breaker,” he said. “So, if I win, the Republicans will hold it 21-19. So it’s a very important race.”

Many conservative leaders in the area have endorsed Peake, including Commonwealth Attorney Darrel Puckett, former Congressman Virgil Goode, former Delegate Watkins Abbitt, Jr., current Delegate Matt Fariss, and Congressmen Robert Hurt, Dave Brat, and Garrett.
Peake explains that while other candidates entered the race on short notice, he has been working for nearly a year speaking with various government officials, board of supervisor members, sheriffs, and regular people. “You can’t throw together a Senate campaign in a month, which is what the Democrats are trying to do,” he said. “I’ve been going all over the district talking to everybody in their nine localities…meeting the voters.”
Peake grew up in Roanoke and now resides in Lynchburg with his wife Lila and their five children. He is a practicing attorney for the Lynchburg-based law firm Caskie and Frost since 1990. There are more than 20 people employed at the firm. Due to Peake’s experience, he understands the necessity of balancing a budget and creating jobs.

Academically, Peake earned a degree at Virginia Tech in 1985 and finished law school at Washington and Lee University in 1988.

Peake is also a member of the Virginia Citizens Defense League and served on the Commonwealth Transportation Board.

Story Here:
http://www.timesvirginian.com/news/article_e8acf0a6-d1f0-11e6-b642-f3d96c16ef89.html

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Special Elections: Could Virginia’s Senate Flip?

Think the election season is over? Think again. Voters in central Virginia are about to head to the polls for two special elections. And, as Michael Pope reports, control of the state Senate is at stake.

Last month, two state senators were elected to Congress — Democrat Donald McEachin and Republican Tom Garrett.

McEachin’s seat is almost certain to be held by Democrats because no Republican will be on the ballot. But Garrett’s seat in the state Senate is a hotly contested race, and if Democrats are able to pick it up, they will take control of the state Senate.

Robert Denton at Virginia Tech says that’s unlikely though.

“The 22nd has a pretty strong Republican base, a pretty strong active core there. But certainly surprises can happen, especially if it’s a cold or bad weather day can make a difference of a couple of percentage points,” says Denton.

Are you eligible to vote in the special elections? Click here to find out if you live in the State Senate’s 22nd or 9th Districts.

But it’s not just the uncertainty of a low-turnout special election in January. There’s another wild card.

Stephen Farnsworth at the University of Mary Washington points out that a third candidate in the race could help Democrats and hurt Republicans.

“What you see in this district as well is an independent conservative third-party candidate, and if that candidate gets a significant share of the vote that would otherwise go to a Republican, there maybe the possibility for a Democrat to win first out of three,” says Farnsworth

Voting? Learn more about the candidates here.

The Democrat in the race is former Fluvanna Sheriff Ryant Washington. He’s running against Republican Mark Peake and independent conservative Joseph Hines.

Election day for the two Senate seats is January 10th.

Story Here:
http://wvtf.org/post/special-elections-could-virginias-senate-flip

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Race is on to replace Garrett in state senate

State Sen. Tom Garrett has set a tentative resignation date of Jan. 3 to vacate his state senate seat ahead of the 2017 General Assembly, so he can move on to Congress.

Garrett’s win in the 5th Congressional District officially kicked off the race to replace him, although two Republican candidates have been campaigning hard for months in the expectation of the Republican from Buckingham’s victory over former Albemarle County Supervisor Jane Dittmar, a Democrat.

Once Garrett officially announces his resignation, Gov. Terry McAuliffe can call a special election, a contest likely to be held the same date as one to replace state Sen. Donald McEachin, D-Henrico, in Senate District 9. McEachin won the newly redrawn 4th Congressional District.

With the 2017 General Assembly convening Jan. 11, the race will be particularly tight if a Democrat steps into the race. No Democrats have announced their candidacy publically for the district that leans strongly in GOP favor.

Two GOP candidates, Lynchburg-area attorney Mark Peake and Goochland County Supervisor Ken Peterson, met the Wednesday evening filingdeadline to be candidates for the Republican ticket.

David Ball, who had announced his candidacy in August, did not meet the registration deadline with the district committee and will not be eligible, Bradshaw said.

“We’ve got two great candidates. I think either one of them would make an excellent senator to replace Tom Garrett,” said Daniel Bradshaw, chairman of the Republican Committee for the 22nd Senatorial District. “I’m wishing both of them the best of luck in their fight to secure the nomination.”

Bradshaw expects about 400 Republican activists to attend the convention and possibly more. If no other candidate runs, that small group would determine who represents the district, which includes Amherst and Appomattox counties and half of Lynchburg.

Peake and Peterson have been working in the periphery of the presidential and congressional campaigns to round up delegates for the convention scheduled for 10 a.m. Dec. 3. The location was not officially set as of Thursday.

To participate in the party nomination contest, people must apply as a delegate with their local committee. The delegates represent their local units at the district convention to pick the nominee. The final number of delegates should be determined Wednesday, Bradshaw said.

The race is Peake’s second run at the district. Garrett defeated him and three others for the Republican nomination in 2011 before taking down Democrat Bert Dodson 58 percent to 42 percent in the right-leaning district.

“I’ve been assuming Tom would win since January, and I’ve been running since January like Tom would win,” Peake said. “As soon as we issued the call declaring that we would have a convention to pick the nomination to replace Tom, I’ve been running as hard as I could to prepare for the convention.”

To win a nominating convention, candidates must generally convince people to register as a delegate with their local unit. Then, they turn to getting their delegates to the one-day electoral event.

“I’ve been spending quite a bit of time in each of the jurisdictions, getting to know the district, seeing what’s on their minds,” Peterson said. “It’s been a real positive experience.”

Garrett said he would not be endorsing a candidate.

“I want to be very clear on the record that every candidate in that field I think would do a good job,” Garrett said. “… I have no desire to get involved.”

Both candidates have spent the past several months visiting unit committee meetings making the case they should be Garrett’s successor.

“We need an outspoken, conservative leader who’s willing to stand up” for conservative principles, Peake said. “I think that’s what Tom Garrett did, and I think the people of the 22nd are looking for someone who will fight for those principles like he did, and I’m committed to doing it like he did.”

Peterson touts his experience in corporate finance and record as Goochland County supervisor. He was re-elected to his second term in 2015.

“It’s a strong solid conservative voting record,” Peterson said. “I think the delegates in general would prefer to see a voting record as to listen to campaign promises.”

Story Here:
http://www.newsadvance.com/news/local/race-is-on-to-replace-garrett-in-state-senate/article_3b0fc218-a81a-5c93-920a-21297753a1b9.html

 

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